Tag Archives: Business Wisdom

Generate Clients with this Non-Fiction Book Layout!

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Have you ever thought of writing non-fiction? Do you offer products or services? Do you think you might like to in the future?

As a writer, there is a system for reaching your earning potential.

Here are some hot tips on writing non-fiction to generate clients!

I’ve included a book outline to help you get started right away.

Having an outline makes it easier to write your book. Breaking it down into chunks or separate topics gives you the opportunity to sit down and do focused writing, one subject at a time.

The Generate Clients Layout is designed to do just that, make you money off the additional products and services you provide. It’s perfect for anyone who coaches, consults, accepts speaking engagements, provides training, or offers courses or webinars.

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INTRODUCTION

If you’re planning on using your book to generate clients, then this outline is for you.

In order to generate clients with your book, you’ll need a layout like the one that you’ll find here. It’s structured to keep the reader focused on the content of the book in the order that it’s presented.

Many readers will skim the contents of a book to grasp the key concepts, it’s the way of today’s busy world. If you want your audience engrossed in your book, soaking up its content, word for word, then this layout will accomplish that for you.


PERSONAL

Before you get started, it’s a good idea to write down your idea of success. This will give you a clear vision of what possibilities you will want to explore using your book as the foundation.

Remember that you are looking to build your business with your book, not just earn a residual income from it. Your audience is your sustainable business profit. Your mark of success is your active network, the people that will purchase your products.

RESEARCH:

Research your topic on amazon, YouTube, and Reddit. Look up popular material that relates to your topic. Study the way the content is structured.

Read through viewer comments and look for trends in what the readers or viewers are wanting – questions they have, likes and dislikes.

Then list the top ten questions or problems and intertwine them into your book. Be sure to take notes as you go.

VOICE:

The voice of your writing should be a conversational one. Tell, don’t sell until the final chapter.

You want your reader to feel as if you are talking with them. You want them to be compelled to talk back to your book.

NOTE ABOUT TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Many writers make the mistake of having boring chapter titles, or worse, descriptive chapter titles. The table of contents is a tool to entice the reader into reading, to draw them into starting from the beginning and consuming every chapter.

If your chapter titles are too descriptive, they’ll give the contents of the chapter away. If they know what the chapter’s about, chances are they’ll stop reading. If they assume they grasp the contents of the book, they won’t feel compelled to read on. They will skip over sections, or not read the book at all.

You want to approach naming your chapters as if you were creating headlines for content – what will make the reader investigate further.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. INTRODUCTION

There is an expectation of your readers that you, as a writer, are an expert on your subject, that you have special knowledge of the concepts which relate to it, that you have a clear idea of the aspects which should be addressed.

You want to introduce who you are, what you are addressing in the book, and what the reader will come away with. This sets the pace for your reader and creates anticipation.

Identify the problems – promise a solution: demonstrate to the reader that you understand them and that your book provides the solution to their problems

How is your approach different from others? Why will people think you have the right answers for them?

Don’t give away the key concepts.

In the chapters immediately following this one, you will approach your readers top concerns, one by one, and use metaphors and analogies to explain your solutions. If you need to add additional key concepts (solutions to concerns), feel free to do so, or, save the new key concepts for a second book.

What is your purpose? Your book should be able to transform into other products.

What are the main ideas you are trying to get across? What will this book enable your audience to do?

2. KEY CONCEPT A

Using metaphors and analogies to explain your solutions on a conceptual level.

Focus on tangible, quantifiable, measurable, concrete messages.

  • What: state the problem the reader is experiencing or how they relate to the key concept – why they should learn and apply it. The reader needs to feel as if you understand them. That you know what they are doing now may not be working – that you have the solution.
  • Why: give the reader the reasons why they should continue to read. Motivate them to read on. Tell them why they should keep reading, reinforce how this concept relates to them.
  • How: explain the solution to their problem conceptually, using metaphors and analogies.

3. KEY CONCEPT B

Using metaphors and analogies to explain your solutions on a conceptual level.

Focus on tangible, quantifiable, measurable, concrete messages.

  • What: state the problem the reader is experiencing or how they relate to the key concept – why they should learn and apply it. The reader needs to feel as if you understand them. That you know what they are doing now may not be working – that you have the solution.
  • Why: give the reader the reasons why they should continue to read. Motivate them to read on. Tell them why they should keep reading, reinforce how this concept relates to them.
  • How: explain the solution to their problem conceptually, using metaphors and analogies.

4. KEY CONCEPT C

Using metaphors and analogies to explain your solutions on a conceptual level.

Focus on tangible, quantifiable, measurable, concrete messages.

  • What: state the problem the reader is experiencing or how they relate to the key concept – why they should learn and apply it. The reader needs to feel as if you understand them. That you know what they are doing now may not be working – that you have the solution.
  • Why: give the reader the reasons why they should continue to read. Motivate them to read on. Tell them why they should keep reading, reinforce how this concept relates to them.
  • How: explain the solution to their problem conceptually, using metaphors and analogies.

5.  KEY CONCEPT D

Using metaphors and analogies to explain your solutions on a conceptual level.

Focus on tangible, quantifiable, measurable, concrete messages.

  • What: state the problem the reader is experiencing or how they relate to the key concept – why they should learn and apply it. The reader needs to feel as if you understand them. That you know what they are doing now may not be working – that you have the solution.
  • Why: give the reader the reasons why they should continue to read. Motivate them to read on. Tell them why they should keep reading, reinforce how this concept relates to them.
  • How: explain the solution to their problem conceptually, using metaphors and analogies.

6. STEP-BY-STEP METHOD

What if: here is where you want to lay out the step by step actions your reader can take to apply the solutions.

These steps should be tactile rather than conceptual.

Go through each step one-by-one. You can put all the steps in one chapter, or spread them out, one step –  per chapter.

7. SUMMARY

You want to end your book with the same momentum you started with, giving the book a proper ending.

Motivate and inspire: it’s important to use the right language, you don’t want to leave the reader feeling overwhelmed. You want them to feel satisfied and motivated to tackle the steps you provided.

You also by this point have earned their interest in any future work from you.

8. CLOSING

This is your opportunity to direct people to contact you to purchase your products and services. Your call to action. This chapter should be half the length of your previous chapters.

Who you serve: who is your specific audience? Your niche? Age? Financial status? Job description? Who are you selling to? What are the attributes of the people who will purchase your services? Express this to the reader so they can see that they are exactly the type of person who should be hiring you for personal help through one of your services.

How you serve them: keep them fascinated, tell them how you have solved problems for other people and how you can do the same for them. You want them to wish they had you on their team. By now you’ve created value with all you’ve given away within the book, so they should feel a bit compelled to repay you.

What next steps do you want your reader to take? Should they inquire about your services, give you a call, consult with you, go to your website? What body of knowledge do you possess that will make your audience take the next step?

You want people to hire you, that’s what your book is about – trying to make the phone ring.

Influence them – get them to buy into what you’re saying.


Have you thought of expanding your brand by writing non-fiction? Tell me about it in the comments below!

I’m open to any questions or comments you might have!


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