Category Archives: For Writer’s

How to Write Flash Fiction

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WHAT IS FLASH FICTION?

Flash fiction is a short-short story told in 2000 words or less. It is my current area of interest because I’m wanting to enter a few pieces in a flash fiction contest, the one I blogged about last week.

So here I sit asking myself where to begin, and my best bet is to learn a few things about what goes into writing a great piece of flash fiction.

At first thought, writer’s who are unfamiliar with these short shorts might think it seems like a fairly easy task to undertake. But considering the limited amount of space that you have to get your story to work its magic, I’m assuming it might actually be a bit more difficult than expected.

Creating just the right setting, only the necessary dialogue – in fact, the perfect dialogue, creating an atmosphere that begs to be explored further, all of this could be a bit of a struggle in the few words available within flash fiction.

WHERE TO BEGIN?

  • With short shorts you need to start in the action, so choose a flashpoint to begin your story.
  • Plot matters less than mood and the details of the telling.
  • What is left out is just as important as what’s included in the writing.
  • Pick one theme.
  • Pay close attention to language.
  • Opt for understated elegance.
  • Subtlety is key.

From the research I’ve done, it’s my understanding that you what to pick a portion of your scene and build on it, let the small focal point tell the story. Keep your readers engrossed with the story that scene tells with all its details and then hit them with an unexpected twist at the end, leaving them wanting more.

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO

  1. Be concise without strangling your plot and characters.
  2. Remember to deliver your message.  No one likes empty envelopes.
  3. Make your prose intense. You can’t burn the reader.
  4. Learn from the birds. Tweet, tweet, tweet(er).
  5. Use prompts to hone your skills.

WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO

  1. Don’t go in circles. You don’t have room for that.
  2. Don’t try to wear many hats. Flash has space only for one or two.
  3. Don’t mince words. You are writing a flash and not making hamburger patties.
  4. Don’t be afraid to experiment. You don’t want to repeat what others have written.
  5. Don’t forget that flash is a story and not a poem or essay.

Wish me luck! I would love to write piles and piles of flash fiction – tons of small stories sounds like a rewarding endeavor.

Please let me know in the comments section below if you have any more tips for me or for fellow readers.

Writing to Make a Difference

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To all the writers I know and have met through social media, I want to say that I believe in you.

I believe that what you have to say can have an impact on the world around you. I believe that you are special and talented and I stand in awe of what most of you have accomplished already. I applaud all of your efforts, especially the time and care you’ve put into creating your works of art.

I hope that I can serve as some sort of inspiration by working tirelessly to compile resources and information to make your entire writing and authoring experience easier and more enjoyable.

As a graphic designer, I am currently writing a book that will help you understand how to go about creating all of the images you will need to successfully brand yourself as an author, publish your book, and market your book and your author platform.

This is something I’ve been working on for a while now. I have come to understand that there are so many of you out there who have something amazing to share but just don’t have the financial resources to get the graphics you need that would most likely serve to launch your successful writing career.

Visual imagery attracts the eye, it draws the viewer into what you’re attempting to promote. If you don’t have great graphics to support what you are trying to sell, the chances of you reaching the audience that’s available to you are substantially reduced. You are more than qualified to do the writing that people will enjoy. But you could benefit by having imagery that lives up to what you have to offer and attracts as many new readers to you as possible.

I hope you will find the information I have to share as a helpful resource as you continue along your journey. I want to make creating the graphics you need fun, easy, and affordable. I’m including templates and examples as well as free resources to help you get the graphic design work done on your own. I think you will not only enjoy the process of creating your own imagery, you’ll see the results in your growing network and book sales.

If you have any suggestions for information you’d like me to include, please let me know in the comments section 🙂

All my best,

Michelle Rene


Coming Soon!

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If you need help with your book cover or author graphics right away, I’m here to serve you…

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A Writer’s Perspective

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You Have a Unique Perspective That’s Worth Sharing

It’s in there, your voice. Your voice is your unique take on the world at large. It’s your very own special twist on things. It’s how you make your writing shine. It’s what will draw the reader’s to you, and keep them coming back for more. It’s something that only you have, and that’s pretty awesome.

You might be way ahead of me in this department, and if you are then my hats off to you. I’ve been writing for years, but I’m still struggling to find my voice. It’s because I haven’t invested the time and effort into my writing that I should.

I know you know what I’m talking about when I say voice. There are several parts of your character or personality that should be consistent in your writing style. If you’re not beginning to see some common traits of yours that shine through in your writing, then chances are you’re not writing enough.

When you find that unique voice, you might not even be able to explain how it came about – let alone describe what it is. That’s the beauty of writing and discovering as you write. Sometimes the best things just happen naturally.

Making the Commitment

Some of us just struggle to carve out the time to devote to our writing. It’s okay, I totally get it, I’m guilty of it too. I should be writing every day, learning more about what kind of writer I’m becoming, because even after a few years at this I don’t feel like I’m quite there yet.

Make a promise to yourself, to work on your writing. I’ll make that promise to myself as well. I will get up an hour earlier every day to focus at least 45 minutes on my writing. Can you do the same, carve out some time every single day to see where your writing can take you? You’re worth it.

(if you’ve had a hard time finding your voice, check out the article below by Jeff Goines, he’s got some really great tips)

Now go kick some ass, it’s Monday 😉



An exercise for finding your voice

“If you struggle with getting people to read your writing or with staying consistent in your craft, you need to stop chasing numbers and productivity and reboot. It’s time to start finding and developing that voice of yours.” – Jeff Goins



Get a Stunning Book Cover Design or Illustration from an Award Winning Artist 

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Young Writers Competition with awards of up to $10,000 in prizes

Around the Web:

Young Writer’s Competition


Are you a 15-18 year old writer?

The Writing discipline includes creative nonfiction, novel, play or script, poetry, short story and spoken word. Writing winners receive entry to a National YoungArts Foundation workshop where they can push the boundaries of their abilities with master teachers in their established field during a week-long program.


WHY APPLY

  • Win cash awards of up to $10,000, an alternative to scholarships to spend as you wish
  • Take master classes with accomplished writers such as Edward Albee, Sarah Shun-lien Bynum, Chinaka Hodges, Marc Bamuthi Joseph, Sam Lipsyte, Campbell McGrath, Joan Morgan, Salmon Rushdie and Rebecca Walker
  • Become eligible for nomination as a U.S. Presidential Scholar in the Arts
  • Receive a lifetime of mentoring and professional support with a rich network of peers
  • Connect to educational and artistic development opportunities

AM I ELIGIBLE?

To apply artists must be:

  • US citizens or have permanent resident status
  • 15-18 years of age or in grades 10-12 on December 1, 2016

SUBMIT by October 14, 2016 at 11:59 PM EST


REQUIREMENTS

Creative Nonfiction and Short Story applicants must submit 2 pieces of writing. Novel applicants must submit a synopsis and an excerpt. Play or Script applicants must submit a dramatic script or a synopsis and an excerpt. Poetry applicants must submit at least 1 poem. Spoken Word applicants must submit 2-3 poems and video performances for each. All the requirements are listed in downloadable PDFs found at the bottom of the contest details page at the link provided below.

Find out more and how to apply at the National YoungArts Foundation


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Source: Writing | YoungArts

How to Beat Your Creative Fears

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Fear sucks, but it’s part of the creative process.

Sooner or later in your writing career you will come up against it. It can stop you in your tracks and make you lose out on some great opportunities. It can also ruin your book by making it less likely to shine.

The only way to beat the fear is to take action.

If you find yourself impeded by fear one of the best ways to get around it is to write about it.

  • Use journaling as a tool to write about your fear, don’t hold anything back, write it all out. Facing the ugliness of your fears about writing by journaling about them will calm you down.
  • It will minimize the anxiety that you’re feeling about whatever creative task has got you so freaked out.
  • It will clear your mind and inspire you to find solutions to your fears which is better then having them dictate what you can or can’t accomplish.
  • Write about how your fear debilitates you, what it stops you from achieving.
  • Note the positives of your fears too. Whatever you do be sure to be honest with yourself, what is it about the fear that seems to be serving you emotionally or otherwise.

Writing about your fears will give you a good perspective on the pros and cons of keeping that fear alive, which will also lead you to some solutions. It can give you the courage to move beyond your fears to accomplish your creative tasks using the full range of your abilities. Don’t let fear stop you from being the best that you can be!

 What do you do when fear butts into your creative process?


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See https://mundusmediaink.com/services/

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