Category Archives: NaNoWriMo

HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR NANOWRIMO BUDDIES

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NaNoWriMo Buddies serve many purposes. They are there to encourage us, bounce ideas off of, to gain insight from and to be encouraged by – and we are there to do the same for them in return.

Here are some tips that will help you make the most out of your relationships with your buddies. They are a resource for you and the writing challenge you’re invested in. They’re invested too and can benefit just as much from open lines of communication.

Making the Most Out of Your Buddy List

  • Don’t be tempted to send out open invites to buddy up with just anyone. I made that mistake yesterday before thinking it through. You will make a mess of your list and probably won’t benefit as much as you would if you take some time and do some vetting.
  • Connect with people who you share your genre, inspire you, or that you’ve gotten to know through the forums.
  • When someone ads you as a buddy, you can return the favor by selecting their name and adding them back.
  • Don’t add everyone. You want to keep your buddy list manageable and fill it with people who will help you to succeed.
  • Take the time to check out your prospective buddies bio’s, novels, and excerpts.
  • Reach out to your new buddy, make it personal.
  • Check your buddies word counts and cheer them on.
  • Check your NaNo email every day.

Do You Have Any Buddy Advice?


I am looking for new buddies…

Come check out my profile on NaNoWriMo: Michelle Rene Goodhew

Tools to Get You Started with NaNoWriMo

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Today is the official start of NaNoWriMo! Are you ready? Well not to worry, I have a few extras to help get you off to a great start!

See Below…


What is NaNoWriMo?

NaNoWriMo is a worldwide event and contest that takes place every year in the month of November. The organization sponsors a website where you can join the event, commit to writing at least a 50,000 word novel over the 30 days of November, track your progress, get access to pep talks and support, and meet fellow writers. You earn badges as you progress and can even start a sponsor page where your friends and family can sponsor your writing.

You write your novel using your own materials: on your preferred word-processing program, by hand, by typewriter, etc. All writers at any stage are welcome. Outlines, character sketches, and other planning steps are encouraged. Just be sure to only count words written during the month. Your novel is fully protected!

See below for links to sign up!


What Do You Win if You Win?

You win NaNoWriMo by writing 50,000 words of your novel between November 1 and November 30. There’s no limit on how many people can win! Just be sure that you’ve validated your 50,000-word novel by turning it in anytime between November 20th and November 30th at 11:59 pm.

You will still win if you reach your goal but have not yet “completed” your novel. Keep writing! What you win is the satisfaction that you’ve completed a novel in thirty days and a collection of Wrimo-only offers from righteous companies who donated to NaNoWriMo in 2016.

Over 250 NaNoWriMo novels have been traditionally published.


Some Tips

  • Take risks with your writing.
  • Drink coffee. A lot of coffee.
  • Make a playlist to be your novel-writing soundtrack.
  • The first week is easier than the second week
  • Lower your standards for household cleanliness. You can clean in December.
  • If you are stuck for finding a quiet place in your house to write, try the bathroom. People rarely interrupt when you’re in the bathroom.
  • Back up your work; emailing pages to yourself is a good option.
  • Don’t edit what you’ve already written – keep moving forward.
  • Take occasional breaks while writing to step outside.
  • Reward yourself for work completed
  • Don’t give up.

Some Great Advice


Some Downloadable PDF’s


Some Awesome Resources


NaNoWriMo Link

NaNoWriMo Sign-Up

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) believes stories matter. The event began in 1999, and in 2005, National Novel Writing Month became a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. NaNoWriMo’s programs now include National Novel Writing Month in November, Camp NaNoWriMo, the Young Writers Program, Come Write In, and the “Now What?” Months.


Must Have Writing Tools for Story Outlining

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Tools and Templates for Your Story Outline

As a writer, I am a planner. I am a huge fan of outlining a story or book and find the process extremely enjoyable.

Brainstorming

Planning your book with a story outline is a great way to break it down into small writing goals, each with a focused idea.

What I love about brainstorming an outline: I can think up an idea, break it down into major scenes, and get an overall feel for the story I’m wanting to write. I can follow a general story arch and make sure that my major scenes are occurring where they need to. It’s a fun exercise that allows me to see the whole story idea come together before a word of it is actually written.


Tools

Scrivener is the number one tool writers use to write their books. It has great options for storyboarding/outlining. It formats your book for uploading to your publisher. Go check out everything this program has to offer. Honestly, if you don’t have Scrivener, I strongly suggest you make the investment. Below is my affiliate link.

Buy Scrivener for Windows (Regular Licence)

If you have Scrivener, another great tool you may want to try is Scapple. Scapple is an easy-to-use tool for getting ideas down as quickly as possible and making connections between them. It isn’t exactly mind-mapping software—it’s more like a freeform text editor that allows you to make notes anywhere on the page and to connect them using straight dotted lines or arrows. If you’ve ever scribbled down ideas all over a piece of paper and drawn lines between related thoughts, then you already know what Scapple does. Plus, you can drag your notes right into Scrivener.


What’s Great About Outlining

  • Outlining breaks down your story idea into small enough segments that you can write about them in one sitting.
  • You can focus on one scene at a time and know where the story is heading so you can really dive into the scene with confidence.
  • You can add details concerning character development to the story arc. I actually add to my outline, about a paragraph on what’s going on in each scene, or what needs to happen, and what’s changing or coming to light with the characters.
  • You can set a milestone goal for each scene and reward yourself each time you’ve finished one. Rewarding yourself along the way will make you more apt to continue with a writing routine.

Books

Here are some great books I recommend if you’re looking to learn more about outlining.

41rtj4w2zzl-_sy346_ Outlining Your Novel: Map Your Way to Success

by K.M. Weiland

 

 


Templates

For those of you who are wanting to get started right away, here are some templates that you can post up as references to help you as you work through your outline. Although there are several different plot themes you could use and many different methods of outlining, in these templates you’ll find a basic outlining method that works well for most works of fiction. However, I highly recommend reading one or more of the books above before you begin.

*Right-click on the template to save to your computer and print. Images should print as 8.5 x 11 inch or you can choose your own printing options if you’d like them smaller.

Step One: Some basics to consider before you start your outline.

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Step Two: Some pre-outline questions that will help you get started.

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Step Three: A layout of a basic story structure for reference.

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Step Four: A story outline template with the story structure highlighted where it should appear within the story arc.

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For an eye-catching book cover design

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