Theresa May to ask MPs for more time on Brexit talks

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The prime minister, who held meetings with members of Parliament on Monday, will update the House of Commons on Brexit talks and outline what will be in the government's motion scheduled to be debated by lawmakers on Thursday.

That will then be followed on Thursday by a debate and voting on a number of amendments. "That gives that sense of timetable, clarity and goal on what we're doing".

"Got to make them believe that the week beginning end of March..."

One member of the government told me on Tuesday: "They have to realise that is it - and if no senior member of the cabinet is willing to do it, then we're heading for that awful choice".

Parliamentary experts have said that even if May succeeds in getting a deal approved by lawmakers, Britain may need to request an extension to the Article 50 exit negotiation period in order to approve necessary legislation.

Theresa May is preparing to resign as British prime minister this summer so she can influence who succeeds her, Cabinet ministers now believe. "We must have our own independent trade policy".

Channel Tunnel Group Ltd. and France-Manche SA accuse the government of a "secretive and flawed procurement exercise" for the backup ferry service in the event of a no-deal Brexit, their lawyer Daniel Beard said in court Monday.

The premier has begun a process to try to renegotiate the so-called Irish backstop - the most contentious part of the divorce deal - and needs a "bit more time" to do so, Leadsom said.

Mr Corbyn has repeatedly said there should be an election if Mrs May can not get a deal through Parliament and he has faced concerted pressure from some in his party to push for a second public vote.

That could open the prospect of an European Union summit scheduled for 21 March being the final opportunity for the heads of government to finalise a deal before the United Kingdom formally leaves the European Union on 29 March.

She'll say that if she hasn't brought them new deal by February 27, there will then be another opportunity to vote, Communities Secretary James Brokenshire confirmed in an interview.

They intend to put down an amendment creating parliamentary time for a bill requiring the Prime Minister and Parliament to decide by mid-March whether the United Kingdom is leaving with a deal, without a deal or whether it will seek an extension to the Article 50 withdrawal process. "No point winning Labour MPs, by losing Tories!"

Theresa May's high-stakes Brexit strategy may have been accidentally revealed on Tuesday, after her chief negotiator Olly Robbins was overheard in a Brussels bar saying MPs will be given a last-minute choice between her deal and a lengthy delay.

But Labour pledged to oppose the move, accusing the Government of showing "contempt for our democracy".

Coming to Parliament after non-starter talks with EU leaders in Brussels last week which saw her return to London empty-handed, Prime Minister Theresa May told members of Parliament that - in contrast to a growing number of the wider public - because they didn't want to leave the European Union without a deal they should support hers rather than voting it down.

The Act, passed by Gordon Brown's administration in 2010, requires 21 sitting days before the ratification of any global treaty.

Ms. May provided few clues on Tuesday as to how she will bridge the impasse and simply told MPs that both sides "agreed that our teams should hold further talks to find a way forward".

The United Kingdom is on course to leave the European Union on 29 March without a deal unless May can convince the bloc to reopen the divorce deal she agreed to in November and then sell it to sceptical British MPs. "The risks to jobs, the NHS and security from No Deal are too great for us to stand back and let the Government drift", Cooper said.

Cooper said her new proposal, which has cross-party support, would press for a vote on an amendment creating time for her bill on February 27, if Prime Minister Theresa May has not passed a Brexit deal by then.

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