Millions of diabetics could be left without insulin by 2030

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The untreated person affected by diabetes were affected by the deterioration of heart, kidney, eyes, nerves, blood vessels, stroke, and the major complication is that these high sugar level patients can not undergo surgery because the healing of a surgical wound is slow and complicated.

While Type-2 diabetes is expected to rise by more than a fifth, from 406 million in 2018 to 511 million in 2030 globally, India along with China and the U.S. will share over half of these high blood sugar cases, say researchers led by one of an Indian-origin, while asserting the need to improve access for the life saving insulin.

It used data from the International Diabetes Federation and 14 studies, which represent more than 60 percent of people with type 2 diabetes worldwide.

The number of people with type 2 diabetes worldwide has been estimated to increase from 405.6 million in 2018 to 510·8 million by 2030, according to study by a Stanford University-led research team released on November 20.

Insulin treatment is costly, and the global insulin market is presently dominated by only three major manufacturers. They found that patients who will be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes will increase from 405.6 million in 2018 to 510.8 million in 2030.

"Despite the UN's commitment to treat non-communicable diseases and ensure universal access to drugs for diabetes, across much of the world insulin is scarce and unnecessarily hard for patients to access. Despite the UN's commitment to treat non-communicable diseases and ensure universal access to drugs for diabetes, across much of the world insulin is scarce and unnecessarily hard for patients to access", said Dr Sanjay Basu, a scientist at the Stanford University and the lead author of the study, Eurekalert.org reported. This translates to a 20 per cent rise in demand for the drug, with only 38 million likely to have access to it according to current resources.

The study also predicts using a higher treatment target for A1C levels, a measure for tracking blood glucose, could reduce the number of people who need to use insulin.

"Despite the U.N.'s commitment to treat noncommunicable diseases and ensure universal access to drugs for diabetes, across much of the world insulin is scarce and unnecessarily hard for patients to access".

Overall, Basu and colleagues calculated that global insulin use was set to rise to 634 million 1,000-unit vials by 2030, from 526 million in 2018.

Sanjay Basu also added that governments should begin effective initiatives to make insulin affordable for patients all across the world. Between 2002 and 2013, the price of insulin tripled although there were only minimal increases in costs associated with the development of the treatment.

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