Afghan election commission officials injured in blast near Kabul headquarters

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People in Kandahar Province went to the polls on Saturday, while elections have yet to be held in central Ghazni Province, which is still reeling from the Taliban's takeover in August.

Afghanistan's first parliamentary elections since 2010 were held against a backdrop of near-daily attacks by the Taleban, who have seized almost half the country and have refused offers to negotiate with the government.

In 2016, the election was postponed over unstable security situation in the country, where various militant groups, including the Taliban and the Islamic State, carry out regular terrorist attacks and fight for power against Kabul.

People attend a burial ceremony of General Abdul Razeq, the Kandahar police commander, who was killed in yesterday's attack, in Kandahar province, Afghanistan October 19, 2018.

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The general Scott Miller, commander-in-chief of the american army and North Atlantic Treaty Organisation in Afghanistan, present at the time of the attack, was unharmed. "We want to vote and will do so even at the risk of our lives", has insured with the AFP Samiullah, an elector of the city of Kandahar.

However, Independent Election Commission (IEC) said no poll would be held in the restive Maruf and Nish districts, as no voters have so far been registered there. Yet millions of Afghans have defied Taliban threats and waited, often for hours, to cast their votes. The delay came in the wake of the assassination of Kandahar police chief Gen. Abdul Raziq.

Afghanistan's first parliamentary elections since 2010 were held against a backdrop of near-daily attacks by the Taliban, who have seized almost half the country and have repeatedly refused offers to negotiate with the Afghanistan government.

The attacker was "identified and gunned down by police before reaching his target", Kabul police spokesman Basir Mujahid told reporters.

IEC figures suggest around half of the almost nine million people registered to vote actually cast a ballot.

Independent Election Commission deputy spokesman Aziz Ibrahimi says voting began at 7 a.m. Saturday at 1,113 polling stations to elect 11 parliamentarians from a slate of 111 candidates.

Voting in parliamentary elections has been completed in 33 of the country's 34 provinces.

Preliminary results of nationwide voting for Afghanistan's 249-seat Parliament are not expected before mid-November.

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