In blow to May, UK’s top Brexit official quits government

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Brexit Secretary David Davis has resigned from the United Kingdom government, effective immediately.

Finally, eurosceptic sources suggest that Mr Davis was utterly unimpressed with learning - when he received his mobile phone back - how Number 10 had aggressively spun its control of Chequers, including threats to resigning ministers requiring taxis rather than their government cars back home. It was reported that the former prime minister David Cameron had been drafted in before the meeting to urge him not to resign.

The staunchly pro-Brexit Conservative MP Andrea Jenkyns tweeted: "Fantastic news".

Mr Davis said the "current trend of policy and tactics" was making it look "less and less likely" that Brexit would deliver on the referendum result and the Tory commitments to leave the EU customs union and single market.

David Davis penned a deliberately caustic resignation letter last night outlining a "significant number" of disagreements with Number 10 over the a year ago, from being obliged to accept the Brussels sequencing of negotiations, through to the compromises on the Northern Ireland border last December.

Mr Davis said "the general direction of policy will leave us in at best a weak negotiating position, and possibly an inescapable one".

In an ominous warning to the Prime Minister, about 60 per cent of those surveyed by the ConservativeHome website said the deal as outlined so far would be bad for Britain if implemented, and the same proportion said they would not support it.

Some 34 per cent thought she should keep hold of the reigns, 24 per cent said she should resign now, while 24 per cent said she should step down after Britain formally leaves the European Union in March next year.

Brexit ministers Steve Baker and Suella Bravermanhas have also resigned.

The resignations come two days after the Cabinet approved the plan in a bid to unblock negotiations with Brussels at a meeting at the prime minister's country retreat at Chequers outside London.

On Monday, May is due to brief lawmakers on the plan agreed by the Cabinet during its 12-hour meeting.

Jacob Rees-Mogg, the chairman of the European Research Group of Brexiteer backbenchers, was openly touted as the only candidate who could deliver Brexit by one MP, Andrew Bridgen.

Tory Andrew Bridgen said he could not support the proposals that came out of Chequers, describing them as a breach of the red lines and that he wouldn't support it "even if the European Union were paying us for it".

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and her cabinet discuss the government's Brexit plans at Chequers, the Prime Minister's official country residence, near Aylesbury, Britain.

It would involve a "facilitated customs arrangement" meant to remove the need for a hard border in Ireland, and the creation of a UK-EU free-trade area, in which the UK would abide by a "common rule book" of EU regulations. Michael Gove, May's environment minister, said on Sunday that while the agreed negotiating stance was not ideal, he believed it delivered on handing back control to Britain.

The environment secretary, a leading Brexiter, said the deal the prime minister achieved at Chequers was not everything he had hoped for but insisted the cabinet was behind it and collective responsibility would prevail.

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